Laboratory for Molecular Diagnostics
Center for Nephrology and Metabolic Disorders

Glomerulonephritis

Glomerulonephritis is a collection of disorders with different pathogeneses and histomorphologies whose common denominator is inflammation of the glomeruli, the fitration barrier of the kidney. Often glomerulonephrites are caused by immunological disturbances and therefore increasingly genetic disorders are found to be essential for its development.

Diagnosis

Basic symptoms are proteinuria and glomerular hematuria. Theres two main symptoms underly the clinical classifiaction into nephrotic and nephritic kidney disease.

Histomorphology allows a more accurate diagnosis and classification into subtypes that differ by histomorphology. Histomorphological studies also allow immunehistochenistry which comes close to a pathogenetic classification.

Most recent genetic fidings allow an even deeper pathognetic classification.

Systematic

Hereditary glomerular disease
Fibronectin glomerulopathy
Glomerulonephritis
C3 glomerulopathy
C3 glomerulonephritis
ADAMTS13
C1QA
C1QB
C1QC
C3
CD46
CFB
CFD
CFH
CFHR1
CFHR2
CFHR3
CFHR4
CFHR5
CFI
CLU
DGKE
PIGA
THBD
Dense deposit disease
ADAMTS13
C1QA
C1QB
C1QC
C3
CD46
CFB
CFD
CFH
CFHR1
CFHR2
CFHR3
CFHR4
CFHR5
CFI
CLU
DGKE
PIGA
THBD
CFHR5 Nephropathy
CFHR5
Goodpasture syndrome
COL4A3
COL4A3BP
COL4A5
Lupus erythematosus nephritis
C1QA
C1QB
C1QC
CFHR1
CFHR3
Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN)
ADAMTS13
C1QA
C1QB
C1QC
C3
CD46
CFB
CFD
CFH
CFHR1
CFHR2
CFHR3
CFHR4
CFHR5
CFI
CLU
CR1 deficiency
CR1
Complement component C1q deficiency
C1QA
C1QB
C1QC
Complement component C1s deficiency
C1S
DGKE
PIGA
THBD
Membranous nephropathy
HLA-DQA1
PLA2R1
Mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis
CXCR1
Complement component C1q deficiency
C1QA
C1QB
C1QC
IgA nephropathy
CFHR1
CFHR3
CFHR5
IgA nephropathy type 1
IgA nephropathy type 2
IgA nephropathy type 3
SPRY2
Schimke Immunoosseous dysplasia
SMARCAL1
Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome
WAS
Glomerulosclerosis
Lipoprotein glomerulopathy
Myoclonus-nephropathy syndrome
Nephritic syndrome
Nephrotic syndrome

References:

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2.

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53.

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55.

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56.

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57.

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58.

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59.

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60.

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61.

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62.

OMIM.ORG article

Omim 137940 [^]
63.

Orphanet article

Orphanet ID 280569 [^]
64.

Wikipedia article

Wikipedia EN (Glomerulonephritis) [^]
Update: April 29, 2019