Laboratory for Molecular Diagnostics
Center for Nephrology and Metabolic Disorders

Measles infection susceptibility

Genetic factor may influence measles infections. Those may include height susceptibility or resistance. Also the immune reaction to vaccination may be affected.

Systematic

Hereditary susceptibility to infections
Disorders of mRNA editing
HIV resistance
Malaria
Measles infection susceptibility
CD46
Meningococcal infection susceptibility
Resistance to trypanosoma brucei
Septic shock

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