Laboratory for Molecular Diagnostics
Center for Nephrology and Metabolic Disorders

Hyper-IgM syndrome

Hyper-IgM syndrome is a group of disorders characterized by elevated levels of the immunoglobulin IgM. The common cause is a defect in immunoglobulin isotype switching to the more specific and efficient immunoglobulins IgA, IgG, and IgE. Clinically the patients are characterized by increased susceptibility to infections.

Systematic

Immunoglobulin disorders
Agammaglobulinemia, X-linked
Hyper-IgM syndrome
Hyper-IgM syndrome 1
CD40LG
Hyper-IgM syndrome 2
AICDA
Hyper-IgM syndrome 3
CD40
Hyper-IgM syndrome 4
Hyper-IgM syndrome 5
UNG

References:

1.

Castigli E et al. (1994) CD40-deficient mice generated by recombination-activating gene-2-deficient blastocyst complementation.

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2.

Kawabe T et al. (1994) The immune responses in CD40-deficient mice: impaired immunoglobulin class switching and germinal center formation.

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3.

Ferrari S et al. (2001) Mutations of CD40 gene cause an autosomal recessive form of immunodeficiency with hyper IgM.

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4.

Kutukculer N et al. (2003) Disseminated cryptosporidium infection in an infant with hyper-IgM syndrome caused by CD40 deficiency.

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5.

Mazzolari E et al. (2007) First report of successful stem cell transplantation in a child with CD40 deficiency.

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6.

Kraakman ME et al. (1995) Identification of a CD40L gene mutation and genetic counselling in a family with immunodeficiency with hyperimmunoglobulinemia M.

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7.

Aruffo A et al. (1993) The CD40 ligand, gp39, is defective in activated T cells from patients with X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome.

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8.

Korthäuer U et al. (1993) Defective expression of T-cell CD40 ligand causes X-linked immunodeficiency with hyper-IgM.

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9.

Allen RC et al. (1993) CD40 ligand gene defects responsible for X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome.

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10.

Kroczek RA et al. (1994) Defective expression of CD40 ligand on T cells causes "X-linked immunodeficiency with hyper-IgM (HIGM1)".

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11.

Pilia G et al. (1994) Human CD40L gene maps between DXS144E and DXS300 in Xq26.

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12.

Padayachee M et al. (1993) Mapping of the X linked form of hyper IgM syndrome (HIGM1)

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13.

Lin Q et al. (1996) A single strand conformation polymorphism study of CD40 ligand. Efficient mutation analysis and carrier detection for X-linked hyper IgM syndrome.

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14.

Bossaller L et al. (2006) ICOS deficiency is associated with a severe reduction of CXCR5+CD4 germinal center Th cells.

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15.

Revy P et al. (1998) Normal CD40-mediated activation of monocytes and dendritic cells from patients with hyper-IgM syndrome due to a CD40 pathway defect in B cells.

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16.

Kutukculer N et al. (2003) Outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in hyper-IgM syndrome caused by CD40 deficiency.

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17.

Mayer L et al. (1986) Evidence for a defect in "switch" T cells in patients with immunodeficiency and hyperimmunoglobulinemia M.

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18.

Cooper MD et al. (1974) Meeting report of the Second International Workshop on Primary Immunodeficiency Disease in Man held in St. Petersburg, Florida, February, 1973.

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19.

Fudenberg HH et al. (1970) Classification of the primary immune deficiencies: WHO recommendation.

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20.

Brahmi Z et al. (1983) Immunologic studies of three family members with the immunodeficiency with hyper-IgM syndrome.

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21.

Levitt D et al. (1983) Hyper IgM immunodeficiency. A primary dysfunction of B lymphocyte isotype switching.

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22.

Hollenbaugh D et al. (1994) The random inactivation of the X chromosome carrying the defective gene responsible for X-linked hyper IgM syndrome (X-HIM) in female carriers of HIGM1.

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23.

Thomas C et al. (1995) Brief report: correction of X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

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24.

Fuleihan R et al. (1993) Defective expression of the CD40 ligand in X chromosome-linked immunoglobulin deficiency with normal or elevated IgM.

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25.

Xu J et al. (1994) Mice deficient for the CD40 ligand.

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26.

None (1994) X inactivation and immunocompetence in female carriers of the X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome.

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27.

Hayward AR et al. (1997) Cholangiopathy and tumors of the pancreas, liver, and biliary tree in boys with X-linked immunodeficiency with hyper-IgM.

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28.

Levy J et al. (1997) Clinical spectrum of X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome.

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29.

Cunningham CK et al. (1999) Enteroviral meningoencephalitis as a complication of X-linked hyper IgM syndrome.

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30.

Hadzić N et al. (2000) Correction of the hyper-IgM syndrome after liver and bone marrow transplantation.

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31.

Gennery AR et al. (2000) T-cell-depleted bone marrow transplantation from unrelated donor for [correction of allogeneic sibling for] X-linked hyperimmunoglobulin M syndrome.

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32.

André P et al. (2002) CD40L stabilizes arterial thrombi by a beta3 integrin--dependent mechanism.

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33.

GLEICH GJ et al. (1965) DYSGAMMAGLOBULINEMIA IN THE PRESENCE OF PLASMA CELLS.

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34.

JAMIESON WM et al. (1962) A family with several cases of hypogammaglobulinaemia.

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35.

Aschermann Z et al. (2007) X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome associated with a rapid course of multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

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36.

Hasegawa S et al. (2014) Whole-exome sequence analysis of ataxia telangiectasia-like phenotype.

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37.

OMIM.ORG article

Omim 308230 [^]
38.

Orphanet article

Orphanet ID 101088 [^]
39.

Wikipedia article

Wikipedia EN (Hyper_IgM_syndrome) [^]
Update: April 29, 2019