Laboratory for Molecular Diagnostics
Center for Nephrology and Metabolic Disorders

Mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis

The most important mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis is IgA nephropathy. Therefore in many textbooks it is considered as one and the same disease. However, the fact that mesangioproloferative glomerulonephritis can occur with other diseases such as lupus nephritis and the recently revealed genetic heterogeneity suggest different pathogentic mechanisms. Mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis is a histomorphological diagnosis characterized by mesangial accumulation of cells and IgA deposits. Clinical picture is dominated by hematuria which is often accompanied by proteinuria and decline of renal function.

Classification

Morphological

Although most renal biopsies show IgA deposits, a small group of non-IgA mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis can be distinguished.[Error: Macro 'ref' doesn't exist]

Pathogenetical

Primary and secodary forms can be distinguished. The latter includes diseases such as lupus nephropathy.

Genetical

Genetic factors can be grouped into risk factors and those that cause diseases that can be accompanied by mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis. For instance, the deletion of the CFRH1 und CFRH3 genes is a well characterized risk factor, and diseases associated with mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis include Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome, complement component C1q deficiency and Schimke Immunoosseous dysplasia.

Systematic

Glomerulonephritis
C3 glomerulopathy
CFHR5 Nephropathy
Goodpasture syndrome
Lupus erythematosus nephritis
Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN)
Membranous nephropathy
Mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis
CXCR1
Complement component C1q deficiency
C1QA
C1QB
C1QC
IgA nephropathy
CFHR1
CFHR3
CFHR5
IgA nephropathy type 1
IgA nephropathy type 2
IgA nephropathy type 3
SPRY2
Schimke Immunoosseous dysplasia
SMARCAL1
Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome
WAS

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Update: Sept. 26, 2018