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Epigenetic dyslipidemia

The group of epigenetic dyslipidemias includes lipid disorder in which the cause can be found in epigenetic modifications. Those modifications can change during lifetime and be be inherited as well. The pedominantly tested epigenetic modifications include methylations of regulator DNA regions.

Systematic

Dyslipidemia
Apolipoprotein deficiency
Betalipoprotein deficiency
Epigenetic dyslipidemia
ABCG1
CPT1A
MIR33B
SREBF1
TNIP1
TNNT1
Hyperalphalipoproteinemia 1
Hyperalphalipoproteinemia 2
Hyperlipemia
Hypoalphalipoproteinemia
Hypobetalipoproteinemia

References:

1.

Lloyd DJ et al. (2002) A novel interaction between lamin A and SREBP1: implications for partial lipodystrophy and other laminopathies.

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2.

Wang X et al. (2005) Cellular fate of truncated slow skeletal muscle troponin T produced by Glu180 nonsense mutation in amish nemaline myopathy.

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3.

Jin JP et al. (2003) Truncation by Glu180 nonsense mutation results in complete loss of slow skeletal muscle troponin T in a lethal nemaline myopathy.

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4.

Johnston JJ et al. (2000) A novel nemaline myopathy in the Amish caused by a mutation in troponin T1.

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5.

Barton PJ et al. (1999) Close physical linkage of human troponin genes: organization, sequence, and expression of the locus encoding cardiac troponin I and slow skeletal troponin T.

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6.

Samson F et al. (1994) A new human slow skeletal troponin T (TnTs) mRNA isoform derived from alternative splicing of a single gene.

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7.

Nadal-Ginard B et al. (1989) Molecular basis of cardiac performance. Plasticity of the myocardium generated through protein isoform switches.

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8.

Samson F et al. (1990) Isolation and localization of a slow troponin (TnT) gene on chromosome 19 by subtraction hybridization of a cDNA muscle library using myotonic dystrophy muscle cDNA.

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9.

Novelli G et al. (1992) Assignment of the slow troponin T (TNNT1) gene to chromosome 19 using polymerase chain reaction.

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10.

Samson F et al. (1992) Assignment of the human slow skeletal troponin T gene to 19q13.4 using somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis.

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11.

Han J et al. (2015) The CREB coactivator CRTC2 controls hepatic lipid metabolism by regulating SREBP1.

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12.

Cui G et al. (2011) Liver X receptor (LXR) mediates negative regulation of mouse and human Th17 differentiation.

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13.

Najafi-Shoushtari SH et al. (2010) MicroRNA-33 and the SREBP host genes cooperate to control cholesterol homeostasis.

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14.

Taghibiglou C et al. (2009) Role of NMDA receptor-dependent activation of SREBP1 in excitotoxic and ischemic neuronal injuries.

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15.

Yang F et al. (2006) An ARC/Mediator subunit required for SREBP control of cholesterol and lipid homeostasis.

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16.

Bengoechea-Alonso MT et al. (2005) Hyperphosphorylation regulates the activity of SREBP1 during mitosis.

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17.

Lin J et al. (2005) Hyperlipidemic effects of dietary saturated fats mediated through PGC-1beta coactivation of SREBP.

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18.

Nagata R et al. (2004) Single nucleotide polymorphism (-468 Gly to A) at the promoter region of SREBP-1c associates with genetic defect of fructose-induced hepatic lipogenesis [corrected].

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19.

Trask B et al. (1993) Fluorescence in situ hybridization mapping of human chromosome 19: cytogenetic band location of 540 cosmids and 70 genes or DNA markers.

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20.

OMIM.ORG article

Omim 600528 external link
Update: Aug. 14, 2020
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