Laboratory for Molecular Diagnostics
Center for Nephrology and Metabolic Disorders
Moldiag Diseases Genes Support Contact

Sulfonylurea receptor

The gene ABCC8 encodes the sulfonylurea receptor a component that regulates the potassium channel in pancreatic beta cells. Loss-of-function mutations and inhibition of the protein result in stimulation of the insulin secretion. Familial hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia is an autosomal recessive and less commonly dominant disorder. Gain-of-function mutations result in permanent or transient neonatal diabetes mellitus which is an autosomal recessive or dominant disorder.

Genetests:

Clinic Method Carrier testing
Turnaround 5 days
Specimen type genomic DNA
Clinic Method Massive parallel sequencing
Turnaround 25 days
Specimen type genomic DNA
Clinic Method Genomic sequencing of the entire coding region
Turnaround 25 days
Specimen type genomic DNA
Clinic Method Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification
Turnaround 25 days
Specimen type genomic DNA

Related Diseases:

Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia 1
ABCC8
Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus
ABCC8
Developmental delay, epilepsy, and neonatal diabetes
KCNJ11
GCK
INS
KCNJ11
Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase superactivity
PRPS1
Wolcott-Rallison syndrome
EIF2AK3
Transient neonatal diabetes mellitus 2
ABCC8
MODY12 diabetes
ABCC8

References:

1.

Proks P et al. (2006) A heterozygous activating mutation in the sulphonylurea receptor SUR1 (ABCC8) causes neonatal diabetes.

external link
2.

Ellard S et al. (2007) Permanent neonatal diabetes caused by dominant, recessive, or compound heterozygous SUR1 mutations with opposite functional effects.

external link
3.

Magge SN et al. (2004) Familial leucine-sensitive hypoglycemia of infancy due to a dominant mutation of the beta-cell sulfonylurea receptor.

external link
4.

Glaser B et al. (1999) Intragenic single nucleotide polymorphism haplotype analysis of SUR1 mutations in familial hyperinsulinism.

external link
5.

Dunne MJ et al. (1997) Familial persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy and mutations in the sulfonylurea receptor.

external link
6.

Verkarre V et al. (1998) Paternal mutation of the sulfonylurea receptor (SUR1) gene and maternal loss of 11p15 imprinted genes lead to persistent hyperinsulinism in focal adenomatous hyperplasia.

external link
7.

Nestorowicz A et al. (1996) Mutations in the sulonylurea receptor gene are associated with familial hyperinsulinism in Ashkenazi Jews.

external link
8.

Thomas PM et al. (1996) Inactivation of the first nucleotide-binding fold of the sulfonylurea receptor, and familial persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy.

external link
9.

Thomas PM et al. (1995) Homozygosity mapping, to chromosome 11p, of the gene for familial persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy.

external link
10.

Tornovsky S et al. (2004) Hyperinsulinism of infancy: novel ABCC8 and KCNJ11 mutations and evidence for additional locus heterogeneity.

external link
11.

Thornton PS et al. (2003) Clinical and molecular characterization of a dominant form of congenital hyperinsulinism caused by a mutation in the high-affinity sulfonylurea receptor.

external link
12.

Huopio H et al. (2003) A new subtype of autosomal dominant diabetes attributable to a mutation in the gene for sulfonylurea receptor 1.

external link
13.

Huopio H et al. (2000) Dominantly inherited hyperinsulinism caused by a mutation in the sulfonylurea receptor type 1.

external link
14.

Otonkoski T et al. (1999) A point mutation inactivating the sulfonylurea receptor causes the severe form of persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy in Finland.

external link
15.

Babenko AP et al. (2006) Activating mutations in the ABCC8 gene in neonatal diabetes mellitus.

external link
16.

Thornton PS et al. (1998) Familial hyperinsulinism with apparent autosomal dominant inheritance: clinical and genetic differences from the autosomal recessive variant.

external link
17.

OMIM.ORG article

Omim 600509 external link
18.

NCBI article

NCBI 6833 external link
19.

Orphanet article

Orphanet ID 117665 external link
20.

Wikipedia article

Wikipedia EN (Sulfonylurea_receptor) external link
Update: Aug. 14, 2020
Copyright © 2005-2020 by Center for Nephrology and Metabolic Disorders, Dr. Mato Nagel, MD
Albert-Schweitzer-Ring 32, D-02943 Weißwasser, Germany, Tel.: +49-3576-287922, Fax: +49-3576-287944
Sitemap | Webmail | Disclaimer | Privacy Issues