Laboratory for Molecular Diagnostics
Center for Nephrology and Metabolic Disorders

Ferritin heavy chain

The FTH1 gene encodes the heavy chain of the ferritin molecule, the most important intracellular iron storage protein. Promotor mutations are responsible for autosomal dominant hemochromatosis 5.

Genetests:

Clinic Method Carrier testing
Turnaround 5 days
Specimen type genomic DNA
Clinic Method Genomic sequencing of the entire coding region
Turnaround 25 days
Specimen type genomic DNA
Clinic Method Massive parallel sequencing
Turnaround 25 days
Specimen type genomic DNA

Related Diseases:

Hemochromatosis 5
FTH1

References:

1.

Ferreira C et al. (2000) Early embryonic lethality of H ferritin gene deletion in mice.

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2.

Eisenstein RS et al. (2000) Iron regulatory proteins and the molecular control of mammalian iron metabolism.

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3.

Kato J et. al. (2001) A mutation, in the iron-responsive element of H ferritin mRNA, causing autosomal dominant iron overload.

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4.

Ferreira C et al. (2001) H ferritin knockout mice: a model of hyperferritinemia in the absence of iron overload.

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5.

Papadopoulos P et al. (1992) A second human ferritin H locus on chromosome 11.

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6.

Pham CG et al. (2004) Ferritin heavy chain upregulation by NF-kappaB inhibits TNFalpha-induced apoptosis by suppressing reactive oxygen species.

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7.

Yachou AK et al. (1991) Mouse ferritin H multigene family is polymorphic and contains a single multiallelic functional gene located on chromosome 19.

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8.

Faniello MC et al. (2006) Detection and functional analysis of an SNP in the promoter of the human ferritin H gene that modulates the gene expression.

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9.

Sammarco MC et. al. (2008) Ferritin L and H subunits are differentially regulated on a post-transcriptional level.

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10.

Shi H et. al. (2008) A cytosolic iron chaperone that delivers iron to ferritin.

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11.

Yachou A et al. (1991) Mouse ferritin H sequences map to chromosomes 3, 6, and 19.

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12.

Li L et al. (2010) Binding and uptake of H-ferritin are mediated by human transferrin receptor-1.

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13.

Hasegawa S et al. (2013) Growth retardation and hair loss in transgenic mice overexpressing human H-ferritin gene.

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14.

Mancias JD et. al. (2014) Quantitative proteomics identifies NCOA4 as the cargo receptor mediating ferritinophagy.

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15.

Gatti RA et al. (1987) Human ferritin genes: chromosomal assignments and polymorphisms.

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16.

Costanzo F et al. (1986) Structure of gene and pseudogenes of human apoferritin H.

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17.

Hentze MW et. al. (1986) Cloning, characterization, expression, and chromosomal localization of a human ferritin heavy-chain gene.

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18.

Leibold EA et al. (1988) Cytoplasmic protein binds in vitro to a highly conserved sequence in the 5' untranslated region of ferritin heavy- and light-subunit mRNAs.

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19.

Youssoufian H et al. (1988) Association of a new chromosomal deletion [del(1)(q32q42)] with diaphragmatic hernia: assignment of a human ferritin gene.

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20.

Murray MT et al. (1987) Conservation of ferritin heavy subunit gene structure: implications for the regulation of ferritin gene expression.

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21.

Worwood M et. al. (1985) Assignment of human ferritin genes to chromosomes 11 and 19q13.3----19qter.

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22.

Cragg SJ et. al. (1985) Genes for the 'H' subunit of human ferritin are present on a number of human chromosomes.

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23.

Caskey JH et. al. (1983) Human ferritin gene is assigned to chromosome 19.

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24.

Boyd D et al. (1984) Isolation and characterization of a cDNA clone for human ferritin heavy chain.

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25.

Harrison PM et al. (1996) The ferritins: molecular properties, iron storage function and cellular regulation.

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26.

Courseaux A et. al. (1996) Definition of the minimal MEN1 candidate area based on a 5-Mb integrated map of proximal 11q13. The European Consortium on Men1, (GENEM 1; Groupe d'Etude des Néoplasies Endocriniennes Multiples de type 1).

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27.

Wu KJ et al. (1999) Coordinated regulation of iron-controlling genes, H-ferritin and IRP2, by c-MYC.

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Update: Sept. 26, 2018