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Center for Nephrology and Metabolic Disorders
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Stimulator of interferon genes protein

The TMEM173 gene encodes a transmembrane protein that is involved in innate immune response by stimmunlating interferone genes. Mutations cause autosomal dominant STING-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy.

Genetests:

Clinic Method Carrier testing
Turnaround 5 days
Specimen type genomic DNA
Clinic Method Massive parallel sequencing
Turnaround 25 days
Specimen type genomic DNA
Research Method Genomic sequencing of the entire coding region
Turnaround 25 days
Specimen type genomic DNA

Related Diseases:

STING-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy
TMEM173

References:

1.

Ishikawa H et al. (2008) STING is an endoplasmic reticulum adaptor that facilitates innate immune signalling.

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2.

Haag SM et al. (2018) Targeting STING with covalent small-molecule inhibitors.

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3.

Dou Z et al. (2017) Cytoplasmic chromatin triggers inflammation in senescence and cancer.

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4.

Harding SM et al. (2017) Mitotic progression following DNA damage enables pattern recognition within micronuclei.

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5.

Lau L et al. (2015) DNA tumor virus oncogenes antagonize the cGAS-STING DNA-sensing pathway.

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6.

Bridgeman A et al. (2015) Viruses transfer the antiviral second messenger cGAMP between cells.

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7.

Gentili M et al. (2015) Transmission of innate immune signaling by packaging of cGAMP in viral particles.

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8.

West AP et al. (2015) Mitochondrial DNA stress primes the antiviral innate immune response.

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9.

Liu S et al. (2015) Phosphorylation of innate immune adaptor proteins MAVS, STING, and TRIF induces IRF3 activation.

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10.

Jeremiah N et. al. (2014) Inherited STING-activating mutation underlies a familial inflammatory syndrome with lupus-like manifestations.

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11.

Zhu Q et al. (2014) Cutting edge: STING mediates protection against colorectal tumorigenesis by governing the magnitude of intestinal inflammation.

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12.

Liu Y et. al. (2014) Activated STING in a vascular and pulmonary syndrome.

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13.

Zhang L et al. (2014) NLRC3, a member of the NLR family of proteins, is a negative regulator of innate immune signaling induced by the DNA sensor STING.

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14.

You F et al. (2013) ELF4 is critical for induction of type I interferon and the host antiviral response.

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15.

Ablasser A et al. (2013) Cell intrinsic immunity spreads to bystander cells via the intercellular transfer of cGAMP.

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16.

Sun L et al. (2013) Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase is a cytosolic DNA sensor that activates the type I interferon pathway.

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17.

Wu J et al. (2013) Cyclic GMP-AMP is an endogenous second messenger in innate immune signaling by cytosolic DNA.

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18.

Chen H et al. (2011) Activation of STAT6 by STING is critical for antiviral innate immunity.

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19.

Burdette DL et al. (2011) STING is a direct innate immune sensor of cyclic di-GMP.

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20.

Ishikawa H et al. (2009) STING regulates intracellular DNA-mediated, type I interferon-dependent innate immunity.

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21.

Sun W et al. (2009) ERIS, an endoplasmic reticulum IFN stimulator, activates innate immune signaling through dimerization.

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22.

Li Y et al. (2009) ISG56 is a negative-feedback regulator of virus-triggered signaling and cellular antiviral response.

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23.

Zhong B et al. (2009) The ubiquitin ligase RNF5 regulates antiviral responses by mediating degradation of the adaptor protein MITA.

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24.

Jin L et al. (2008) MPYS, a novel membrane tetraspanner, is associated with major histocompatibility complex class II and mediates transduction of apoptotic signals.

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25.
Update: Aug. 14, 2020
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