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Center for Nephrology and Metabolic Disorders
Moldiag Diseases Genes Support Contact

Interferon gamma

The IFNG gene encodes the cytokine interferon gamma which plays an important role in Th1 CD4 T cell maturation and macrophage stimulation to kill intracellular microbes. Mutations cause defects in immunological defense against mycobacteria in particular.

Genetests:

Clinic Method Carrier testing
Turnaround 5 days
Specimen type genomic DNA
Clinic Method Massive parallel sequencing
Turnaround 25 days
Specimen type genomic DNA
Research Method Genomic sequencing of the entire coding region
Turnaround 25 days
Specimen type genomic DNA

Related Diseases:

Immunodeficiency 69
IFNG
AIDS progression
IFNG
Hepatitis C response to therapy
IFNG
Congenital isolated ACTH deficiency
TBX19
Tuberous sclerosis 2
IFNG
TSC2

References:

1.

Rossouw M et al. (2003) Association between tuberculosis and a polymorphic NFkappaB binding site in the interferon gamma gene.

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2.

Huang Y et al. (2007) A functional SNP of interferon-gamma gene is important for interferon-alpha-induced and spontaneous recovery from hepatitis C virus infection.

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3.

Cooke GS et al. (2006) Polymorphism within the interferon-gamma/receptor complex is associated with pulmonary tuberculosis.

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4.

Chang S et al. (2005) Histone hyperacetylated domains across the Ifng gene region in natural killer cells and T cells.

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5.

Spilianakis CG et al. (2005) Interchromosomal associations between alternatively expressed loci.

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6.

Svensson A et al. (2005) Protective immunity to genital herpes simplex [correction of simpex] virus type 2 infection is mediated by T-bet.

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7.

Koh KP et al. (2004) T cell-mediated vascular dysfunction of human allografts results from IFN-gamma dysregulation of NO synthase.

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8.

Dufour C et al. (2004) Homozygosis for (12) CA repeats in the first intron of the human IFN-gamma gene is significantly associated with the risk of aplastic anaemia in Caucasian population.

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9.

An P et al. (2003) A tumor necrosis factor-alpha-inducible promoter variant of interferon-gamma accelerates CD4+ T cell depletion in human immunodeficiency virus-1-infected individuals.

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10.

Barton ES et al. (2007) Herpesvirus latency confers symbiotic protection from bacterial infection.

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11.

Messi M et al. (2003) Memory and flexibility of cytokine gene expression as separable properties of human T(H)1 and T(H)2 lymphocytes.

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12.

Dabora SL et al. (2002) Association between a high-expressing interferon-gamma allele and a lower frequency of kidney angiomyolipomas in TSC2 patients.

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13.

Ben-Asouli Y et al. (2002) Human interferon-gamma mRNA autoregulates its translation through a pseudoknot that activates the interferon-inducible protein kinase PKR.

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14.

Szabo SJ et al. (2002) Distinct effects of T-bet in TH1 lineage commitment and IFN-gamma production in CD4 and CD8 T cells.

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15.

Cavet J et al. (2001) Interferon-gamma and interleukin-6 gene polymorphisms associate with graft-versus-host disease in HLA-matched sibling bone marrow transplantation.

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16.

Binder GK et al. (2001) Interferon-gamma-mediated site-specific clearance of alphavirus from CNS neurons.

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17.

Zohlnhöfer D et al. (2001) Transcriptome analysis reveals a role of interferon-gamma in human neointima formation.

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18.

Takayanagi H et al. (2000) T-cell-mediated regulation of osteoclastogenesis by signalling cross-talk between RANKL and IFN-gamma.

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19.

Schoenborn JR et al. (2007) Regulation of interferon-gamma during innate and adaptive immune responses.

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20.

Bai Y et al. (2008) Interferon-gamma induces X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis-associated factor-1 and Noxa expression and potentiates human vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis by STAT3 activation.

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21.

Kosaka H et al. (2008) Interferon-gamma is a therapeutic target molecule for prevention of postoperative adhesion formation.

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22.

Pacheco AG et al. (2008) IFNG +874T/A, IL10 -1082G/A and TNF -308G/A polymorphisms in association with tuberculosis susceptibility: a meta-analysis study.

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23.

King VL et al. (2009) Interferon-gamma and the interferon-inducible chemokine CXCL10 protect against aneurysm formation and rupture.

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24.

Baldridge MT et al. (2010) Quiescent haematopoietic stem cells are activated by IFN-gamma in response to chronic infection.

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25.

Zaidi MR et al. (2011) Interferon-γ links ultraviolet radiation to melanomagenesis in mice.

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26.

Zielinski CE et al. (2012) Pathogen-induced human TH17 cells produce IFN-γ or IL-10 and are regulated by IL-1β.

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27.

Braumüller H et al. (2013) T-helper-1-cell cytokines drive cancer into senescence.

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28.

Barin JG et al. (2013) Fatal eosinophilic myocarditis develops in the absence of IFN-γ and IL-17A.

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29.

Sa Q et al. (2015) Cutting Edge: IFN-γ Produced by Brain-Resident Cells Is Crucial To Control Cerebral Infection with Toxoplasma gondii.

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30.

Iijima N et al. (2016) Access of protective antiviral antibody to neuronal tissues requires CD4 T-cell help.

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31.

Arbore G et al. (2016) T helper 1 immunity requires complement-driven NLRP3 inflammasome activity in CD4⁺ T cells.

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32.

Filiano AJ et al. (2016) Unexpected role of interferon-γ in regulating neuronal connectivity and social behaviour.

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33.

Kerner G et al. (2020) Inherited human IFN-γ deficiency underlies mycobacterial disease.

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34.

Nathan CF et al. (1983) Identification of interferon-gamma as the lymphokine that activates human macrophage oxidative metabolism and antimicrobial activity.

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35.

Fields PE et al. (2002) Cutting edge: changes in histone acetylation at the IL-4 and IFN-gamma loci accompany Th1/Th2 differentiation.

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36.

Justice MJ et al. (1990) A genetic linkage map of mouse chromosome 10: localization of eighteen molecular markers using a single interspecific backcross.

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37.

None (1977) The status of interferon.

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38.

Creagan RP et al. (1975) Somatic cell genetic analysis of the interferon system.

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39.

Shimizu A et al. (1992) A molecular genetic linkage map of mouse chromosome 10, including the Myb, S100b, Pah, Sl, and Ifg genes.

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40.

Tzoneva M et al. (1988) Selective immunodeficiency with defect in interferon-gamma induction in two sibs with recurrent infections.

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41.

Luster AD et al. () Gamma-interferon transcriptionally regulates an early-response gene containing homology to platelet proteins.

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42.

Lipinski M et al. (1980) Natural killer and killer cell activities in patients with primary immunodeficiencies or defects in immune interferon production.

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43.

Mantei N et al. (1980) The nucleotide sequence of a cloned human leukocyte interferon cDNA.

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44.

Blalock JE et al. (1980) Human leukocyte interferon: structural and biological relatedness to adrenocorticotropic hormone and endorphins.

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45.

Maeda S et al. (1980) Construction and identification of bacterial plasmids containing nucleotide sequence for human leukocyte interferon.

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46.

Devos R et al. (1982) Molecular cloning of human immune interferon cDNA and its expression in eukaryotic cells.

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47.

Yip YK et al. (1982) Purification of two subspecies of human gamma (immune) interferon.

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48.

Gray PW et al. (1982) Structure of the human immune interferon gene.

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49.

Naylor SL et al. (1983) Human immune interferon gene is located on chromosome 12.

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50.

Teles RM et al. (2013) Type I interferon suppresses type II interferon-triggered human anti-mycobacterial responses.

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51.

Trent JM et al. (1982) Chromosomal localization of human leukocyte, fibroblast, and immune interferon genes by means of in situ hybridization.

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52.

Knight E et al. (1980) Human fibroblast interferon: amino acid analysis and amino terminal amino acid sequence.

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53.

Zoon KC et al. (1980) Amino terminal sequence of the major component of human lymphoblastoid interferon.

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54.

Zimonjic DB et al. (1995) Mapping of the immune interferon gamma gene (IFNG) to chromosome band 12q14 by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

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55.

Bureau JF et al. (1995) The gene coding for interferon-gamma is linked to the D12S335 and D12S313 microsatellites and to the MDM2 gene.

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56.

Diaz MO et al. (1993) Nomenclature of the human interferon genes.

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57.

Tsubota K et al. (1999) Regulation of human leukocyte antigen expression in human conjunctival epithelium.

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58.

Pravica V et al. (1999) In vitro production of IFN-gamma correlates with CA repeat polymorphism in the human IFN-gamma gene.

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59.

Diefenbach A et al. (1999) Requirement for type 2 NO synthase for IL-12 signaling in innate immunity.

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60.

Awad M et al. (1999) CA repeat allele polymorphism in the first intron of the human interferon-gamma gene is associated with lung allograft fibrosis.

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61.

Bream JH et al. (2000) Polymorphisms of the human IFNG gene noncoding regions.

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62.

White AC et al. (2000) Interferon-gamma expression in jejunal biopsies in experimental human cryptosporidiosis correlates with prior sensitization and control of oocyst excretion.

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63.

Khani-Hanjani A et al. (2000) Association between dinucleotide repeat in non-coding region of interferon-gamma gene and susceptibility to, and severity of, rheumatoid arthritis.

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64.

Pravica V et al. (2000) A single nucleotide polymorphism in the first intron of the human IFN-gamma gene: absolute correlation with a polymorphic CA microsatellite marker of high IFN-gamma production.

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65.

Badovinac VP et al. (2000) Regulation of antigen-specific CD8+ T cell homeostasis by perforin and interferon-gamma.

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Update: Aug. 14, 2020
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